Zikaron Basalon Header

Israeli project Zikaron Basalon (Remember in the living room) is back for a second year. Zikaron Basalon brings the Holocaust memory by hosting a holocaust survivor or second generation in living rooms around the city on Holocaust memorial day. The living room sessions foster an open and intimate conversation. The unique and authentic tradition started in Israel, offers Columbus a new method to address the implications of the Holocaust.

Houses will be open in Bexley, German Village, New Albany, North West, Reynoldsburg (for Russian speakers), Berwick (For teens) , Marion Village (For young adults), Hillel OSU and CharismaLife ministries church. The address for your location will be emailed to you by Thursday morning of the event.

For more information about OSU Hillel event contact Rabbi Ilan for details at rabbiilanosu@gmail.com. For the Teens event contact Rabbi Dovid Kimche dkimche@ncsy.org.


Thanks to all the volunteers for opening their homes and their hearts and for our speakers: Fran Greenberg, Marlene Brisk, Manny Luttinger, Sandy Hackman, Debbi Sugarman, Gayle Rosen, Amy Schottenstein, Rabbi Dovid Kimche, Keila Naparstek, Gail Rose, Alison Mautz, Victor and Dora Levenstein, OSU Hillel and CharismaLife ministries church and Pastor David Swaggerty.

Zikaron Basalon Committee: Debbi Sugarman (Chair), Merav Livneh Dill (Senior Shlicha), Justin Shaw (JCRC), Meri King (JFS), Rabbi Ilan Schwartz (OSU Hillel), Annie Shmookler (Columbus Jewish federation), Morgan Palnik.

Profiles on our speakers:

Trudy Blumenstein knows that her parents, Salomon and Klara Hochmann, died in Auschwitz because their names are in Gedenkbuch: Memorial Book for the German Victims of the Holocaust, an official publication by the German government listing all known Holocaust victims. She bookmarked the page so she can find her parents among the millions of others.

Born in Wiesbaden, Germany, Blumenstein, her brother and parents fled the country for France after the Nazis came to power. Eventually, she was put on a train headed for a Roman Catholic convent in Chimay, France. At the convent, Blumenstein was one of 125 children, 25 of them Jews. She received a different name, Therese Hogge, a Catholic education and upbringing. She was solemnly forbidden from telling anyone she was Jewish, lest she or the nuns be killed by the Nazis. Blumenstein knows that her parents, Salomon and Klara Hochmann, died in Auschwitz because their names are in Gedenkbuch: Memorial Book for the German Victims of the Holocaust, an official publication by the German government listing all known Holocaust victims. She bookmarked the page so she can find her parents among the millions of others.

Marlene Brisk lives in New Albany, Ohio.  She and her husband Jim Briske have three daughters.  She is an attorney and Vice President of Lease Administration at Schottenstein Property Group.  She is also a member of New Albany City Council.  Her parents were both born in Poland and were both survivors of the concentration camps of Nazi Germany. Marlene`s parents used to speak at schools about their experiences during the Holocaust. Since they have passed on, she now speaks on their behalf.

Fran Greenberg was born in Paris, France in 1937. Fran’s father was rounded up in one of the early raids on Jewish families in Paris. He was ultimately sent to Auschwitz in 1942. During the war, Fran and her sister were sent to a series of foster homes with grim conditions. Fran survived the war in a Catholic children’s hospital after she was diagnosed with tuberculosis.
Sandy Hackman is a child of Holocaust Survivors. Both of her parents were Holocaust survivors. Sandy’s mother lived in an exclusively Jewish shtetl called Trochenbrod in Poland. As a young girl, Sandy’s mother spoke to her about life before, during and after the war. Her family, remarkably, survived the extermination of 5,000 fellow residents who died in the killing fields.
Manfred Luttinger was born in Mannheim, Germany in 1932. During Kristalnacht (Night of Broken Glass) in 1938, his father’s photography store was destroyed along with the other Jewish shops. His parents survived the pogrom and on their savings attempted to leave Nazi, Germany. With help from an old friend of his father, the family was able to escape to Switzerland illegally.
Debbi Dach Sugarman is the Daughter of Morris Dach who was born in Plonsk,Poland in 1923. In 1942 Morris, his parents and his 3 older brothers were deported from the Plonsk Ghetto to Auschwitz Birkenau. Debbie’s father was the only survivor.